I own 12 pairs of adidas shoes and the Rebelcross is up there with one of the most comfortable models I’ve worn. It doesn’t quite match the amazing adidas adicross Retro, but it’s definitely one of the nicest and most stable shoes out there and should be considered one of the most comfortable golf shoes around.

It does this through adidas’ Boost technology, which is very well disguised – a good thing as Boost technology used to be a nightmare to keep clean. Boost is adidas’ premium comfort layer that’s made by expanding thermoplastic polyurethane particles to “form closed cells around tiny pockets of air.” The fact that the Rebelcross comes with Boost is a sign that it’s a premium golf shoe, and the price reflects that, as it’s only slightly below the price of the Tour360.

Adidas golf shoes photographed indoors

The Rebelcross is a superb golf shoe.

(Image credit: future)

The Rebelcross is a spikeless leather model and one of the nicest looking shoes you will find. The brand has been at the forefront of sustainability and the Rebelcross is made from materials generated from production waste, such as clippings and post-consumer household waste.

After testing it over a number of laps and wearing it off course, I found it to offer fantastic grip and supreme comfort. It has a stretchy insole under the laces for comfort and the heel support clip adds a locked-in feel. The ‘Gripmore’ technology certainly works as it is super grippy despite officially being a spikeless shoe. The exterior is a mix of full-grain leather and microfiber, so it should keep your feet dry in standard wet conditions, but it’s not officially sold as fully waterproof.

Illustrated Golf Shoes

(Image credit: future)

The brand’s adicross line is basically golf apparel and footwear that can be worn off the course in everyday life, but the Rebelcross is definitely more golf oriented to me.

I was expecting this to be a sneaker disguised as a golf shoe, but I would prefer my Retros, ZX or Crossknit 3.0 when not on the course as the Rebelcross looks a lot like a golf shoe to me due to its wide base, height and firm leather upper. It’s sad, I tested it in the white colorway and I can experience the black option differently. That’s certainly not a bad thing because for $160 (£140) this is a superb golf shoe that does everything you expect it to.

There are two downsides to the Rebelcross for me. First, the style on top of the foot is just not nice to look down on in my opinion. This is a personal opinion, but the slit looks a bit odd and I would have preferred a simpler leather look. From the side, however, there’s no denying that this shoe looks fantastic. Second, and more importantly, the leather started to crease and crease far too soon for what is a high-end golf shoe. Maybe I was the wrong size but as usual with adidas I went up half a size and the fit is great so I’m not entirely sure about that.

View of golf shoes looking down on them

Despite the great looks from the side, I wasn’t a big fan of the design when looking down on them. The creasing after two laps was also more than expected.

(Image credit: future)

I rectified this by keeping them in shoe trees and cleaning them after the rounds but if you don’t take care of them, in white at least, they will start to look very tired very quickly in the vamp area – the upper part of the shoe which covers the toes. After two rounds I was already seeing some significant creases, so this is definitely something to look out for and watch out for when owning a pair of Rebelcrosses.

All in all, this is a premium offering that will be a firm favorite with many golfers and a worthy contender for the best spikeless golf shoes. The details are great, I didn’t even mention which tongue I like, and it’s extremely comfortable and grippy. The upper certainly creased sooner than I expected and it’s not sold as fully waterproof, and the price is very close to the Tour360s, so some golfers might want to pay a little more and get the shoe brand ultimate.